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08 Aug 2016 in G+ Posts, by
This Day in Aviation History
Originally shared by +Gazing Skyward TV August 7th, 1963First flight of the Lockheed YF-12. The Lockheed YF-12 was an American prototype interceptor aircraft evaluated by the United States Air Force. The YF-12 was a twin-seat version of the secret single-seat Lockheed A-12 reconnaissance aircraft, which led to the U.S. Air Force's Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird twin-seat reconnaissance variant. The YF-12 set and held speed and altitude world records of over 2,000 mph and over 80,000 ft (later surpassed by the SR-71), and is the world's largest manned interceptor to date….. Source:Wikipedia, Lockheed YF-12: http://gstv.us/1J0jCND YouTube, The Lockheed YF-12: http://gstv.us/1J0jBta If you enjoy the "This Day in Aviation History" collection, you may enjoy some of these other collections from Gazing Skyward TV: http://gstv.us/GSTVcollections Photo from: http://gstv.us/2aZM5c7 #avgeek #Lockheed #YF12 #military #USAF #USA #aviation #history #fb  
08 Aug 2016 in G+ Posts, by
A Grumman F-14 Tomcat flies over downtown Detroit City
Originally shared by +Keith Allingham A Grumman F-14 Tomcat flies over downtown Detroit City.  
08 Aug 2016 in G+ Posts, by
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Originally shared by +Grzegorz M. Rutkowski (Greg)  
08 Aug 2016 in G+ Posts, by
A Consolidated B-24:Liberator, a Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress, a North American B…
Originally shared by +Keith Allingham A Consolidated B-24:Liberator, a Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress, a North American B-25 Mitchell and a North American P-51 Mustang all in one photo!  
08 Aug 2016 in G+ Posts, by
Rocket plumes are pretty hard to film, because they're not only very bright, but different parts of the image have different brightnesses, so filming at a single exposure doesn't work very well. Fortunately, NASA has been developing a camera specifically for this kind of thing: basically a slow-motion video camera with built-in HDR, so it can film simultaneously at several exposures and combine the result.
Originally shared by +Yonatan Zunger And the result is pretty great to watch. It's fun as a video, of course, but extremely important as a way to see the flow of superheated gases leaving the nozzle: critical to improving everything from safety, to power, to fuel efficiency. NASA Captures Details of a Rocket Test With Its New CameraYou’ve never truly seen what a rocket plume looks like. They are extremely bright and therefore, have never been photographed properly and unless you want to stare directly into one, it’ll be nearly impossible to imagine. Although that’s difficult, considering there haven’t been cameras that could capture its image before.
06 Aug 2016 in G+ Posts, by
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02 Aug 2016 in G+ Posts, by
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02 Aug 2016 in G+ Posts, by
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02 Aug 2016 in G+ Posts, by
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02 Aug 2016 in G+ Posts, by